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Podcast: Naturalism: Is There More to Nature Than Meets the Eye? with Mike Blackaby

Naturalism

Sermon Series: “The Philosophy of Jesus: How Christianity Answers our Deepest Longings”

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For more information about Cafe on Main please visit their website.

Podcast: Communism-Forced Charity or Inward Generosity with Mike Blackaby

Communism

Sermon Series: The Philosophy of Jesus: How Christianity Answers our Deepest Longings

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Podcast: Existentialism: Creating Ourselves or Discovering Ourselves with Mike Blackaby

existentialism

Sermon Series: The Philosophy of Jesus: How Christianity Answers our Deepest Longings

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Podcast: Eyes Wide Open by Mike Blackaby

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Hear Mike Blackaby speak live or listen to other podcasts at: cafeonmain.org

Podcast: Faith Like a Child, Not Childish Faith by Mike Blackaby

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Podcast: Unfinished Masterpiece by Mike Blackaby

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Podcast: Interview with Mike Flournoy with Mike Blackaby

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Book Review: Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of our Daily Choices

164262_599645136724539_970989253_nReview by Carrie Blackaby

by Julie Clawson (InterVarsity Press: 2009)

Our everyday choices reflect our ethics whether we realize it or not. And our actions affect far more people than we might think.Everyday Justice

In Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of our Daily Choices, Julie Clawson offers a great intro into the world of social justice, and she shows how even seemingly insignificant actions—such as grocery shopping or ordering coffee—can have a global impact.

For example, by purchasing and consuming a chocolate bar that was produced by forced child laborers in Africa, we sustain a system of injustice and cruelty. However, by choosing Fair Trade products as an alternative (available in most grocery stores and online), we support fair wages and safer working conditions instead. Likewise, buying locally grown produce when possible reduces the carbon footprint involved with transportation, while also benefiting local farmers (and it usually tastes better!). Clawson’s premise is that we have a responsibility as Christians to uphold biblical morality even in our smallest actions (including how we shop).

In each chapter Clawson looks at different areas of life or consumerism involved with social justice: Coffee, chocolate, cars, food, clothes, waste, and debt. After she gives an overview of the problem (typically in the form of a narrative), she offers concrete ideas for how to approach the issue more justly. She shows in practical ways that everyone is capable of making a difference. She also includes a list of resources at the end of each chapter for those who would like to pursue the subject further.

Because the problem of social injustice can seem overwhelmingly huge, Clawson encourages her readers to make small changes over time rather than becoming paralyzed by the idea of overhauling our lives at once. She writes, “All of us can discern where God is leading us to alter our lives—to change one thing at a time, taking the time to really understand and get behind our actions. Sometimes insisting that the revolution be slow means that it will actually be doable” (15).

Overall, Clawson really does show that living justly is doable. The book is a good resource for those looking for practical advice on how to make socially responsible decisions, one small change at a time.

Podcast: Going the Right Direction by Mike Blackaby

 

 

 

 

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Podcast: A Wise Work Ethic by Mike Blackaby


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